Not Jumping to Conclusions and Firing Early

Not Jumping to Conclusions and Firing Early

Not Jumping to Conclusions and Firing Early

Last week I received an email from one of my son’s teachers. It was a group email sent to parents of children who had not even attempted, let alone submitted, an assessment item.

Now, my very first reaction was heavily influenced by the fact that technology has been a bit of an issue at home with that same child of late. So my internal dialogue was saying something like “I’ve had about enough of this. I’m going to tell this kid a few home truths and that phone is gone until he gets his act together.”

But then my rational side started to weigh in on the conversation making the point that, yes, the phone has been a problem at home, but for this kid to not even attempt an assessment was absurdly out of character.

So I resolved to get his side of the story first and sent a quick reply back to the teacher thanking them for letting us know and assuring them we would look into it.

Five minutes later, I received a reply from the teacher apologising because we had been accidentally added to the email. In fact, Karson had not only handed it in but was probably looking at an A for his assignment.

Obviously, I was relieved that I had considered a different (and rational) perspective to my first reaction and sent that reply email. I guess as much our ‘gut reaction’ can be spot on at times, we also need to remember that our initial responses can also be clouded by lots of things as well.

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